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Crested Serpent Eagle.
One of the most common raptors in the central Indian jungles. One may come across these winged beauties while scanning upper branches of tall trees and in some cases just besides bamboo thickets with dense foliage beneath.
Panna National Park
December 2017

Rajan R D Good shot, following your pictures from Panna.

over 2 years
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Innocence in the eyes....... A lone sambar stag from the woods of Central India. One of the most important component of the prey base, the sambar deer is largest deer species found in Indian Jungles. Usually found in herds of not more than 10, the males generally are found grazing alone during non breeding seasons. Their size makes them a great prey, a single sambar kill can feed a tiger or a leopard for quite some days and is like a feast for packs of wild dogs, thus making it a very important part of the predator prey cycle.
Tried framing a portrait of this lovely stag.
Sambar
December 2017

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over 2 years

Varad Bansod Thank you very much

over 2 years
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On our last safari we decided to explore the Pipartola and surrounding area instead of going behind T1 tigress and cubs at Budhron area where they had made a kill, when we reached the path was laid with leopard pugmarks and suddenly a series of alarm calls grabbed our attention, a leopard suddenly leaped from one bush to another giving us a glimpse of rosetts, we decided to wait and see if it returns, the alarm calls started again after sometime, this time the intensity was even higher and continuous calling could be heard, we waited patiently and were finally delighted to see this beast emerge from the bushes and run around in the grassland.
The terror amongst the herbivores was so high that the alarm calls echoed throughout the grassland.
Striped Hyena (Just a record shot)
Panna National Park
December 2017

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Varad Bansod Thank you everyone!!

over 2 years
over 2 years
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Shikra
Panna National Park
Dec 2018

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Walking with the Pardhis
On our recent venture at Panna, we got an opportunity to experience a beautiful activity undertaken by "Last Wilderness Foundation". A walk with the real stake holders in conservation on their home turf it was. This activity is conducted by LWF, who are working on a wide spectrum for betterment of the tribal population around some Protected areas.
पन्ना, पारधी और पँथर -
In this walk we got an insight in "Reading" a jungle through various signs and marks which it bears. Starting with identification of certain indigenous flora, our pardhi ecologists helped us to understand the ecological as well as economic benefits of various plants. Then came an even more interesting part of the session, where Batal bhaiyya explained to us how various animals communicate and the way in which he explained it to us was very very special. He actually mimicked the communication calls of various wild animals right from Peacocks, Quails to Jackals and Leopards. It was as if the animals were calling right in front of us. He explained to us, how on field these calls were once used to lure various animals towards traps laid by hunting communities. These traditional skills now are being channelized for greater cause through such activities. We walked with our two pardhi ecologists through the buffer understanding various aspects of reading the signs and tracking some animals. Through scats/pellets, Pugmarks, Scrape marks etc they explained to us animal behaviour traits. On our way back, we halted at the sound of an alarm call given out by a Sambar deer, it's alarm was echoing through the jungle. All of a sudden, after an alarm call we heard a huge grunt and it kept on increasing. A leopard it was! We could not believe our ears, we were actually having a leopard sighting and the most beautiful part of it was that we were not even seeing any of the animals yet were enjoying scene. No one of us can forget this experience of exploring the forests with the "Sons of the forest".
Everyone visiting Panna should do this activity if you want to experience "Eco-Tourism" in its true sense. Getting the communities around our PAs, some livelihood opportunities like these helps to reduce their dependency on forest resources which has effects on conservation efforts as well as the social status of the communities.
Panna National Park
December 2018.
- Va₹ad Bansod
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